I Now Pronounce You Offensive

Normally I don’t issue statements or make judgments about movies I haven’t yet seen (except to say – “Wow that film looks like crap – I can’t wait to NOT see it!”). However I have had to endure endless previews for I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry for what seems like months now. The movie, in case you don’t know, is about two straight firefighters who pretend to be a gay couple to get domestic partnership benefits. Yeah right. Every time my partner and I have to sit through this thing, we roll our eyes and comment on how unfunny and offensive it looks. Apparently, GLAAD (Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation) doesn’t agree.

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According to towleroad.com, GLAAD has given the movie its seal of approval, stating that “the film promotes tolerance more than any use of broad comedic strokes might unwittingly mock the real-life struggle for marriage rights.” Testimonials from GLADD reps and people who have worked on the movie chime in with the “acceptance” bit and the feeling that it’s all in good fun and it’s sweet and stresses the importance of family and blah blah.

Here’s the thing: the trailer is what sells the movie. It is supposed to be edited in a way that conveys the spirit of the movie and gets people interested. Who is the trailer selling to? Gays and lesbians who take the struggle for equal rights very seriously, or straights who are cool with gays and may even have gay friends, but hey it still kinda gives them the heebee jeebees, man??

Case in point: in the trailer, a man approaches Kevin James and says he wants to discuss his domestic partnership. James falls off the ladder he was standing on in shock. Adam Sandler feels Jessica Biels breasts and cries “Icky!” in mock gay disgust. James’ child asks him if he and Sandler are “homosexicals” (aw, how cute) – cut to James looking freaked out and flustered. During their wedding (administered by Rob Schneider in an offensive “Chinaman” costume), instead of kissing, the two guys smack each other. Okay we get it – the two guys are so not gay and are freaked out by acting gay. So what’s the point?

Hey I’m all for a little un-PC humor, even at the expense of gays, but from the looks of things this film amounts to little more than mockery. I’m sure it’s not intended in a mean-spirited way (giving the filmmakers the benefit of the doubt), but the concept alone is hard to take lightly, much less the way it’s executed (at least in the trailers). It seems less intent on promoting “tolerance” (a tepid word which rarely amounts to actual acceptance and understanding) and more focused on reinforcing the straight male fear of all things gay, or even the appearance of gay. Boiled down to a word: “homophobia.”

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58 Comments

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58 responses to “I Now Pronounce You Offensive

  1. I literally just saw the trailer for this about two seconds ago. My first thought was, ‘uh…You’re taking one of the arguments surrounding gay marriage and trivializing it, inserting the usual “straight guys scared of gay men comedy routine” to make a pretty serious issue into something that a midwestern dad of three can laugh at?”

    Uhg.

  2. L

    Amen, Todd. A-freakin-men. These trailers pissed me off since I first saw them. I can already tell it traffics in the most offensive stereotypes imaginable. Who greenlights this shit?

  3. Hey, Todd, this is how I felt about Will and Grace. I watched about half of one of the first episodes years ago and was so put off by what I saw as screaming stereotypes–and wasn’t/isn’t there a Latina housecleaner/maid? I turned it off and haven’t gone back.

    On the other hand, many people I love and respect think the show rocks.

  4. Grendel72

    We already know the movie is going to contain offensive amounts of Adam Sandler.
    To be honest, while I’m sure as hell not going to see the movie, and the whole concept offends me* I think in a way if anything is going to reach the mouthbreathers it’ll be something like this.
    I’m not going to waste my money on it, and I’d hope nobody I know would, but maybe we can hope it’ll still have some kind of positive effect.

    *The whole concept reeks of the idiotic “special rights” talking point. It’s ridiculous to me that when we’re denied rights and not a single freaking civil union law is actually equal to what heteros get with marriage somehow straight guys are going to be drawn to get them some of those special rights we all get.

  5. Allie

    Yeah – I would add in the preview I saw where a kindergardener says to one of the firemen on “career day” at school “Do you have two jobs, cause my dad says you’re a butt pirate.” Super funny. Really. Can’t stop laughing at stereotypical gay insult.

    I don’t know – maybe GLAAD has seen the whole thing & it’s put in context and oh we all learned something – but the previews are not selling that to me at all. They make me cringe.

  6. I say the only way this movie works is if one of them ends up realizing he’s actually gay at the end of the film.

  7. This film lost me at “Adam Sandler.” I don’t care if it’s directed by Ang Lee.

    The only thing that could make it worse is if it had David Spade in it.

  8. Todd

    Brynn, I have to agree with you on Will and Grace. I always found it funny that so many gays were offended by Queer as Folk, which maybe presented stereotypes and painted us in a not-so-flattering light, but was at least honest and presented us as human beings with sex drives and problems — but were never offended by the neutered charicature-driven misntrel show that was Will and Grace.

    I think Chuck and Larry looks like merely a pandering waste of time because anyone who is pro gay rights is so far ahead of the bullshit it’s pushing, and any “mouthbreather” that needs to be educated is just going to be there to laugh at teh gays.

  9. Brynn, I have to agree with you on Will and Grace.

    Me, too. And, btw, Grace was the totally wrong stereotype to boot. That girl was so not a fag-hag, it wasn’t even funny.

  10. Paul the Spud

    PASS.

    Folks, this movie can’t be funny. Dan Ackroyd is in it. Dan Ackroyd. That’s comedy death!

    The whole concept reeks of the idiotic “special rights” talking point. It’s ridiculous to me that when we’re denied rights and not a single freaking civil union law is actually equal to what heteros get with marriage somehow straight guys are going to be drawn to get them some of those special rights we all get.

    Damn right, Grendel; that’s exactly what I was thinking when I first heard about this movie.

  11. Well, I cringe (and change the channel) when I see the trailer, and I’m a straight chick, so I can only imagine how my gay pals feel. I especially hated the tampon-buying thing–we’re gay, not transsexual! I mean, grow the fuck up, Hollywood.

    MB, it would be worse by orders of magnitude if they put Jean Claude Van Damme, Bruce Willis, or Fred Thompson in it. Come to think of it, though, I would probably pay to see Fred Thompson buying tampons onscreen.

  12. This film lost me at “Adam Sandler.” I don’t care if it’s directed by Ang Lee.

    In Sandler’s defense: Punch-Drunk Love.

    Please note, that is not in this movie’s defense, lol. Only Mr. Sandler’s.

  13. Zack

    I say the only way this movie works is if one of them ends up realizing he’s actually gay at the end of the film.

    Yeah, that’s pretty much what I thought when I first saw the trailer last month. I suppose there’s a chance Kevin James’s character could ultimately be gay, but I’m not holding my breath.

    What gets me is that this is basically a weird cross-pollinization of Tootsie and Some Like It Hot, without the wit and honesty of either film. I can see something like this getting made back in the ’80’s, when it would’ve been billed as a sort of “Very Special Comedy!!!” but it just doesn’t play anymore. What’s next? A Soul Man remake?

  14. What’s next? A Soul Man remake?

    Bwah ha ha ha!

  15. I don’t know–I think there is something to the idea that a film like this–bad as it will undoubtedly be–may cause the typical, unthinking gay-basher to rethink his or her position on something like same-sex marriage. Adam Sandler is going to reach an audience that may not even think about it as an issue. Of course, a lot depends on how the movie wraps up, etc., and certainly the butt pirate joke (which I hadn’t seen in the trailer) doesn’t lead me to believe that it’s going to do much, but there is a possibility that it’s going to work in a beneficial direction.

    But I don’t plan to see it to find out. Adam Sandler movies have roughly the same effect on me as Vogon poetry.

  16. NameChanged

    I was wondering when we would get to this piece of crap. I don’t work, and I watch way too much tv, so I have been fuming about this movie for a while now.

    It is soooo easy for same-sex couples to get any sort of benefits, that all the straight single guys out there should just go ahead and do it. And the social worker on the case will definetly be a foxy-broad who wants a gay-pet to feel her boobs and go shopping with. Ugh! 😦

  17. Paul the Spud

    I don’t know–I think there is something to the idea that a film like this–bad as it will undoubtedly be–may cause the typical, unthinking gay-basher to rethink his or her position on something like same-sex marriage.

    But for this to happen, he/she would actually have to go see the movie, and I seriously doubt people of this mindset would actually go pay to see this thing. “What? I’m not paying to see that fag movie!

  18. But for this to happen, he/she would actually have to go see the movie, and I seriously doubt people of this mindset would actually go pay to see this thing. “What? I’m not paying to see that fag movie!“

    It’s not those people I’m thinking about–they’re the equivalent of the anti-choicers who wouldn’t vote for a Democrat no matter how much he or she panders to them. It’s the ones who simply don’t consider the issue at all and want to see an Adam Sandler movie.

  19. Paul the Spud

    Well, we can only hope. 🙂

  20. Allie

    In Sandler’s defense: Punch-Drunk Love.

    Please note, that is not in this movie’s defense, lol. Only Mr. Sandler’s.

    Also: Spanglish.

    And I admit to actually liking the two he did with Drew Barrymore – The Wedding Singer and 50 First Dates. But I’m a sentimental, sappy, romantic kind of dyke.

  21. Allie, I like all three of those, too. And even his “dumb” comedies have always struck me as being more good-hearted and non-reliant on meanness than most. (Including the ones he’s only produced, like Grandma’s Boy, which is seriously stupid and funny as hell.)

    I just thought PDL was the best example of why not to write him off in toto.

  22. Brian

    I’m sorry, but GLAAD approving of this movie offends me. This smacks of the same “take what we can get” attitude that some gay people and a lot of straight people seem to have. I actually had someone that I was arguing with about gay marriage try to point out how much better our situation was today than in the past, and I pointed out to him that not getting dragged behind trucks and lashed to fences all the fucking time hardly counts as progress. Two straight men pretending to be gay and hitting each other at their tragic parody of a wedding isn’t only unfunny, it’s insulting.

  23. This is going to be one of those movies we look back on in later decades and wonder how we could have possibly found this inoffensive enough to greenlight. It’s the Gung Ho (or yeah, Soul Man) of the ’00s.

    I’m guessing that it’ll end with Adam Sandler’s character hooking up with Jessica Biel’s, and with Kevin James’ character finding another solution to his pension issue (reuniting with his ex?). Maybe they’ll “learn a lesson” about not being homophobic after they see how they’re treated – they’ll be more accepting, and only “accidentally” use slurs, which they will apologize for.

  24. Kate217

    Ang Lee directed this abomination?!?!?!?!?!?! Say it ain’t so…. That totally breaks my heart.

    I knew 3 seconds into the first time I saw the trailer that I would find this film impossibly offensive, even with the inevitable heavy-handed “gays are people, too” message that it undoubtedly contains.

    Even if it looked to be brilliant, I will NEVER forgive Adam Sandler for using Click as a (nearly) two-hour fat-shaming vehicle. He’s seen the last penny that I will ever spend on him, which is a shame because I loved Opera Man and Spanglish.

  25. not getting dragged behind trucks and lashed to fences all the fucking time hardly counts as progress

    Well, yes it does.

    It just doesn’t count as equality.

  26. Not to mention that this is yet another movie with a 40-something dude and a 20-something female love interest.

    The age gap between Sandler and Drew Barrymore was 11 years — not too creepy. But, his female leads just keep getting younger.

    Just wait and see, Sandler will be 60 and still doing movies with 20-year-old starlets.

    Yuck!

  27. Jewel

    Ok, Fritz, I gotta respectfully disagree with the age gap issue. My sweetie is 26 years my senior, and there’s nothing creepy about it. I know it’s a Hollywood stereotype, the older-man-younger-hot-woman thing, and I’m aware of the sexist implications. But not all older man, younger woman relationships are creepy or sexist.

    And on topic, I too was immediately put off by the ‘special rights’ implications of the movie trailer. Not to mention the ‘ew gays are icky’ implications.

  28. Ok, Fritz, I gotta respectfully disagree with the age gap issue.

    I’m sorry if you took offense. I should have chosen my words more cafefully.

    However, your loving relationship is not the same as Adam Sandler hiring a hot young actress to be his love interest. That IS creepy AND sexist.

    The fact is we rarely see 40-year-old actresses as love interests for 40-year-old.

    A 26-year age difference is quite unusual — and you know that.

    To constantly show that as the norm in movies is what creeps me out.

    It means that mature women are devalued by the men who make most of the movies in Hollywood. The whole “casting couch” concept creeps me out, too. They won’t hire a woman unless she has a perfect, 20-year-old body.

  29. Arkades

    I say the only way this movie works is if one of them ends up realizing he’s actually gay at the end of the film.

    Or, at least, the only way it could work out to something vaguely positive despite all the inane and offensive drivel it shovels at us on the way there…

    I’m in a quandary… I really like Kevin James (and my husband even has a crush on him) but I find Adam Sandler consistently repellent. I’d like to think the movie has a cool twist in it somewhere, but the way it’s being marketed makes me afraid that the whole things drowns in a sea of ‘gee, it’s a SUCH TERRIBLE BURDEN for these straight guys to endure having other people think they might be gay!’. I really want it to be funny and uplifting, but it looks like it will be hateful stereotype-o-rama. I can’t decide if I want to hold my nose and see it and hope to be pleasantly surprised, or avoid it for as long as possible.

    (and, seriously, KJ’s character associates maxipads with gay men? Makes no freakin’ sense, other than to portray the character as clueless and to get in a cheap shot at transexuals along the way.)

    Plus, the general premise irks: heaven forbid those poor desperate guys risk losing their beloved Straight privilege! Why, then they’d *only* have their Male privilege and their White privilege to fall back on, and how far can *those* get you in our society, anyway?

  30. The fact is we rarely see 40-year-old actresses as love interests for 40-year-old.

    We did in The 40-Year-Old Virgin…except I know you hated that movie b/c of the drunk driving scene.

  31. JoAsakura

    An interesting coda to “Will and Grace”: John Barrowman, who plays the bisexual Capt. Jack Harkness in Dr. Who/Torchwood (and who is gay) was turned down for the role of Will because “he was too straight”.

  32. Arkades

    Not to mention that this is yet another movie with a 40-something dude and a 20-something female love interest.

    The age gap between Sandler and Drew Barrymore was 11 years — not too creepy. But, his female leads just keep getting younger.

    Wow, really? (check IMDB) I’m surprised to learn that Biel is only 24; I actually had her pegged somewhere around 30 or so.

    Just wait and see, Sandler will be 60 and still doing movies with 20-year-old starlets.

    Wow, Woody Allen really *was* a film pioneer in so many ways, huh?

  33. BTW: Has anyone heard Sandlers Gay Robot bit?

    Hateful, homophobic, bigoted:

    [audio src="http://www.mp3-host.com/uploads/a1332.47f13.mp3" /]

    Give it a listen.

    Sandler and his buddies are watchin’ the game, knockin’ back a few brews, when his neighbor’s GAY robot comes over and asks all the guys if he can fuck them up the ass.

    Ha, ha. Stupid straight guy humor.

  34. Arkades

    Grace was the totally wrong stereotype to boot. That girl was so not a fag-hag, it wasn’t even funny.

    Word. She was *way* too high-maintenance to be a fag hag.

  35. Jewel

    Gotcha, Fritz, and I agree – I’m just overly sensitive about this because of people treating me like I’m creepy or a freak or a victim because I have an older boyfriend. I totally agree that the Hollywood stereotype is creepy and sexist.

  36. Zack

    Biel just got off (ha!) playing the love interest for Nicolas Cage in the exhaustively titled Next, which was just as skeevy. Especially when they had a perfectly good Julianne Moore right there in the room.

    And since nobody else has said this–Kate217, Ang Lee did not direct this movie. We have Dennis Dugan, the autuer behind Big Daddy, Saving Silverman and Problem Child, to thank.

  37. We did in The 40-Year-Old Virgin…except I know you hated that movie b/c of the drunk driving scene.

    I know, you loved it. But, if you recall my boyfriend was killed by a drunk driver. That was pretty traumatic.

    I hadn’t yet thought about him today, BTW.

  38. Jewel

    Arkades: “the way it’s being marketed makes me afraid that the whole things drowns in a sea of ‘gee, it’s a SUCH TERRIBLE BURDEN for these straight guys to endure having other people think they might be gay!’”

    Thanks for articulating what was bothering me about the trailer that I hadn’t quite been able to put my finger on: the notion that it’s really the Straight White Men who are oppressed by homophobia. Phbbbt to that.

  39. I know, you loved it. But, if you recall my boyfriend was killed by a drunk driver. That was pretty traumatic.

    I hadn’t yet thought about him today, BTW.

    I wasn’t trying to be snarky, Fritz. I was just noting that I remembered you didn’t care for the movie, which is probably why it didn’t come to mind as a popular recent example. Jesus.

  40. I wasn’t trying to be snarky, Fritz.

    I didn’t think so. But, that’s a touchy subject for me. That’s why a HATED that movie and could only make it past that scene. It really upset me.

  41. Brian

    not getting dragged behind trucks and lashed to fences all the fucking time hardly counts as progress

    Well, yes it does.

    It just doesn’t count as equality.

    That wasn’t my point. My point was that this movie is reminiscent of the type of crap I’ve heard before, where someone basically says “we don’t beat you anymore, isn’t that good enough?” It’s like the people making this movie are saying “we don’t wanna drag you behind trucks, we just want to mock your very serious life situations”, and they act like this is something they deserve kudos for. We shouldn’t reward people who are wrong when they aren’t wrong anymore.

  42. Little Mac

    I lack the ability to say for sure what a movie I haven’t seen yet is going to be like, but to suggest that you can judge the film based on the trailer is pretty ridiculous. The trailer is indeed “what sells the movie,” but the idea that the trailer “is supposed to be edited in a way that conveys the spirit of the movie” is just flat out wrong.

    Popcorn movies like this one often have a simple social message to them, and you almost never get that in the trailer, because they’re trying to sell the dumb comedy, not the message. Evan Almighty had a preachy environmental message in the end, but you didn’t get any of that from the trailer. I haven’t seen Hairspray in any form, but from what I understand it has an anti-racism message that you don’t see any of in the trailers for the new movie (it also stars a fat girl, though you wouldn’t guess that based on how little time she gets in the trailer…).

    Point being, the Sandler movie may well be offensive, but there’s no way you can judge that based solely on the trailer.

  43. Brian

    Point being, the Sandler movie may well be offensive, but there’s no way you can judge that based solely on the trailer.

    What was in the trailer offended me. If it’s in the movie, it will still offend me. Even if they both end up gay in the end, prancing through meadows and hugging puppies and teaching large groups of multi-ethnic children to read, it will not erase the fact that they have a mock wedding where they slap each other in the face rather than kiss.

  44. Point being, the Sandler movie may well be offensive, but there’s no way you can judge that based solely on the trailer.

    I dunno. An offensive trailer usually means the movie will be offensive.

    There’s a trailer running for a film called Captivity that is obviously about a fashion model who is kidnapped and tortured by a sadistic killer. I’m sure this film is just as offensive as the trailer.

  45. Yeah, I think that the film MIGHT have redeeming qualities in it (I can just see James and Sandler becoming “enlightened” on the struggle it is to be gay and to fight for acceptance) but that excuses not one little bit of the homophobia-flogging the film company is engaging in wth the trailer. Not one bit.
    Imagine the flack if this were a film about a white girl marrying a black man just to piss off her family. You think they’d show racist grandpa on the porch in all his offensive glory? Doubtful.
    Homosexuals: the last bastion of bigotry and fear for the masses to trot out.

  46. Kate217

    Thanks, Zack, I guess my sarcasmometer is due for an adjustment. 😀

  47. Kate217

    Oh, and Fritz, bug hugzzzzzzz (from an actual fag hag).

  48. Todd

    To Little Mac’s and Brian’s points, you can absolutely determine that a movie is offensive just by the trailer, because as Brian said, what’s in the trailer will be in the movie. It doesn’t matter what else is stuffed into the movie to look “PC.” If all the characters decide to be loving and tolerant and accepting of gays and have a big gay orgy at the end, it still doesn’t matter if, through the rest of the film, they made fun of and belittled the gay lifestyle and gay relationships. Furthermore, it does matter how the trailer is edited and presented because it is designed to appeal to its target audience. And clearly, from the looks of all the trailers I’ve seen for this thing, its target audience is people who think gays are gross, weird, scary, or funny, not sophisticated gay or gay-friendly audiences.

  49. Jewel

    You know, if the men in the movie learn to be tolerant and accepting and actually say, in the movie, “Wow, that faux wedding we had where we slapped each other instead of kissing was homophobic and offensive,” then the movie might not be as homo-bashing as the trailer suggests. But somehow, I doubt that’s going to happen.

  50. IMO, if a movie is trying to make any kind of point about equal rights, and is promoting acceptance, then that message should be in the trailer. There isn’t one redeeming moment in the entire trailer for me.

    It’s a 99.99..% probability that I will only ever see the trailer, but I’ve now seen it, and that’s probably true for many people in this country — regardless of their orientation, political outlook, etc.. They’ll only see the trailer.

    Which means to me — People like me get to be offended. People like my fundamentalist brother-in-law get to walk away with their stereotypes re-inforced (gay people don’t really love each other and want to spend their lives together, they just want to destroy society by demanding “special rights”, a sock in the jaw is less offensive than a man-on-man kiss, being gay is laughable, worthy of ridicule — a laugh riot!, and if you hang around with, or embrace the concept of teh gay in any way, no matter how manly you are, you will end up spouting “faggy” things like “You’re a monster!”.)

    So, even if there were a “redeeming message” that’s not in the trailer, who’s going to actually see the movie to receive it? Gays like me? Probably not. Thinking straight people? Probably not. My fundamentalist brother-in-law? Probably not. We will only see the trailer.

    And even if there is a redeeming message, and a handful of die-hard KJ and Sandler fans see the film AND are transformed by it, I still don’t see how the “minus side” of this trailer could balance to any “plus side” the movie might bring as a real step forward for LGBT rights.

    So, the subject matter becomes simply another way for the movie industry to capitalize on our issues (Hey, look, we’re hip! We’re talking about domestic partnerships! — oh, but no one is actually queer — the trailer should tell you that — “Totally Straight”) while simultaneously re-enforcing the attitudes that keep us dis-enfranchised.

    Loved Sandler in Spanglish, BTW.

  51. Brian

    PortlyDyke, thank you for explaining that more comprehensively and understandably than I can right now. I’m just pissed off.

  52. Justin

    From the stand point of a young gay american. I have mixed feeling about the movie. I agree that it has a lot of offensive things in the trailer. And I do not think I will be spending money to go see it. I am also shocked that GLADD took the standpoint it did.
    But, at the same time. How many movies are there that have stereotypes about African Americans, or Teenagers, or even older Americans. It has been a while since anyone has come out with a movie that pokes a little fun on gay America. Maybe it is our turn. Think about it, Barber Shop, Not Another Teen Movie…did everyone else really loose that much sleep over having a movie make fun of them a little?

  53. Little Mac

    I’d like to add that I also found the trailer offensive. And yes, the way Hollywood markets movies is also very often offensive. I’m just saying that a whole bunch of random moments from the movie, removed because they’re still “funny” (and I didn’t really find them funny) when they’re out of context and then choppily edited together to appeal to the kind of people who go to see Adam Sandler movies aren’t necessarily going to be representative of the message of the movie itself.

    If Kevin James’ character turns out to be gay in the end, or the characters grow to be less homophobic and embrace tolerance, then that in fact does change the significance of the moments of homophobia from earlier in the movie. Because the message will be that their earlier attitudes were wrong.

    The trailer is offensive: many of us have seen it, and we all seem to agree. Whether the movie as a whole is offensive is difficult to judge, because no one involved in this discussion has seen it (whereas I presume someone at GLAAD has, and apparently they found it to be about tolerance.)

    And it doesn’t really matter if we universally agree that the kind of people seeing this movie won’t “get” a message of tolerance. If the message is there, it’s there.

  54. Ang Lee directed this abomination?!?!?!?!?!?! Say it ain’t so…. That totally breaks my heart.

    Sorry, Kate, I should have been clearer in saying that I wouldn’t go see an Adam Sandler movie even if it was directed by Ang Lee. Even his genius couldn’t get me to spend $10 to see someone as woefully lacking in talent as Mr. Sandler.

  55. I say the only way this movie works is if one of them ends up realizing he’s actually gay at the end of the film.

    which is, i’ve heard, how Boat Trip ended. though, i think in this one, it’ll be one of their firefighter co-workers who comes out at the end, giving everyone the opportunity to Grow and Learn™.

  56. Justin — I’m willing to take my licks on lesbo stereotypes. My sense of humor is epic.

    As to “Not another teen movie” — never saw it, never will, can’t comment.

    “Barber Shop” — saw it — directed by a black man, written by a black man.

    Show me one out gay person who directed, produced, or wrote “I now pronounce you . . .” and I’ll reconsider my stance.

    Here’s a quote from the director’s bio: Audiences that go to my movies don’t want a message. They don’t want my soul exposed or my life view. They just want to laugh.

    Do you want this man in your brain?

  57. Em

    I’ve seen this movie before. It’s a remake of an Australian indie film. The original wasn’t very good either.

  58. Tiffanie

    Todd, I felt the same way as you when I saw the trailer. It really doesn’t seem like it could be funny at all. It definitely trivializes the current struggle for equal marriage rights. And, yes, they act all grossed out every time they actually have to act like a couple. Jeez how enlightened. Oh.. and they bicker… that’s so funny… two dudes bickering.. I’m just falling off my seat.

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