One Step Over

“The tuxedo is a wedding safety device, created by women because they know that men are undependable. So in case the groom chickens out, everybody just takes one step over, and she marries the next guy.”—Jerry Seinfeld

Grain of truth in every joke:

Villagers at a wedding in eastern India decided the groom had arrived too drunk to get married, and so the bride married the groom’s more sober brother instead, police said Monday.

“The groom was drunk and had reportedly misbehaved with guests when the bride’s family and local villagers chased him away,” Madho Singh, a senior police officer told Reuters after Sunday’s marriage in a village in Bihar state’s Arwal district.

The younger brother readily agreed to take the groom’s place beside the teenage bride at her family’s invitation, witnesses said.

“The groom apologized for his behavior, but has been crying that word will spread and he will never get a bride again,” Singh said by phone.

Passed along by Mr. Shakes, who notes: “I thought it was interesting how the family decided just to ‘give her’ to the other brother. Well, we’ve spent all this money on a wedding, and invited all these people…

It’s a good thing Mr. Shakes was able to rein it in on our wedding go-down-to-City-Hall-and-get-hitched-then-go-for-burgers day, since he’s an only child.

7 Comments

Filed under 01_shakespeares_sister

7 responses to “One Step Over

  1. oddjob

    When you get the chance watch The Namesake. You’ll understand why I post this comment here once you do that.

  2. GRUMPY OLD MAN

    Passed along by Mr. Shakes, who notes: “I thought it was interesting how the family decided just to ‘give her’ to the other brother. Well, we’ve spent all this money on a wedding, and invited all these people…”

    And when can we expect the Kilted wonder to come home from the hospital?

  3. Actually, he wasn’t even joking. He was (rightfully) disgusted.

  4. GRUMPY OLD MAN

    But I was because I knew he would be.

  5. To be fair, India is a different culture and likely the marriage was prearranged. From what I understand (some documentary about love and marriage and divorce on PBS or HBO or something) — and I’m sure I’ll be corrected if wrong — their marriages result in happy lives and less divorce/break up than our Western-style marry-for-happiness weddings. So, in this case, kicking out the troublesome brother — i.e. realizing that arrangement was going to be very bad news for the woman — and doing a quickie arrangement with what may be the good brother (I don’t know him… 🙂 ) is in line with general practice.

    Surely some arrangement cultures (not necessarily all — I don’t know) have to be at least as good if not better at getting a match right than hanging out in bars and supermarkets is.

  6. To be fair, India is a different culture and likely the marriage was prearranged.

    Yes, I realize that. That’s kind of the whole point. 😉

  7. I just finished reading The Bookseller of Kabul by Asne Seierstad. The whole arranged marriage thing is pretty well put on display. Yes, sometimes the marriages work out well and both parties are happy but I would argue that the lower incident of divorce has more to do with cultural forces that prevent a woman from leaving an abusive husband than the differences in chosing mates.

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